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Courses

Biology

BIO 101 Introduction to Biological Science (4cr.)

Introduces students to topics that are organized around major life functions and the structures that serve them. Topics include cellular structure and function, maintenance and regulation, reproduction and development, genetics, and basic ecological principles. Designed for non-science majors. Three hours lecture, two hours laboratory weekly.

BIO 115 Writing in the Sciences (1 cr.)

An introduction to writing and reading within the biological sciences. Topics include review and analysis of the scientific method, library research techniques, the language of science; and reading scientific books, journals, abstracts and peer-review articles.  One-hour lecture and two hours recitation.

BIO 111-112 General Biology (4 cr. per semester)

This sequence offers an in-depth overview of the primary biological principles of molecular, cellular, and organismal biology. Students survey selected plants and animals to illustrate problems and theories related to living systems and their interactions with the environment. Three hours lecture and two hours laboratory weekly. Students must earn a grade of ‘C’ or better in BIO 111 to qualify for BIO 112.

BIO 200 Introduction to the Biology of Aging (3 cr.)

Emphasizes the changes that occur during the aging process in humans and other mammalian species from a comparative biological point of view and integrates the biological with social and psychological problems. Changes at the molecular, cellular, physiological, and organismic levels will be examined. Prerequisites: BIO 112 or BIO 101.

BIO 201 General Microbiology (4 cr.)

Topics cover morphology and ultra-structure, microbial evolution and diversity, pathogenicity and host responses, as well as the impact of microbiology on medicine and industry. Instruction is provided on the general methods for identification and growth of bacteria, and the effects of chemical and physical agents on microbes. Other areas include immunity, epidemiology, diagnosis, pathogenicity, treatment, and prevention of important pathogenic microorganisms and the diseases that they cause. Three hours lecture reviews and three-hour laboratory weekly. Prerequisite: BIO 112.

BIO 202 Plant Science (4 cr.)

An introduction to the plant sciences. Emphasis is placed on the unique role plants play in the ecology of living things. Course topics include plant taxonomy, morphology, physiology and genetics. In addition, recent scientific advances, such as the development of genetically modified crops, the use of medicinal plants and plant derivatives, and the role of plants in the context of climate change and “green energy” will be discussed. Three hours of lecture, three hours laboratory weekly.

BIO 212 Human Genetics (3 cr.)

Provides an overview of the basic principles of heredity,theoretical, and practical problems, and heredity and evolution as it relates to humans. For non-science majors only. Three hours lecture weekly. Prerequisite: BIO 101.

BIO 213 General Genetics (4 cr.)

Provides instruction on the basic principles of heredity,evolution and genetics of both prokaryotes and eukaryotes. Special emphasis is placed on molecular properties of genetic material and its ability to replicate, recombine, mutate, and direct RNA and protein synthesis. Attention is also given to the functional interactions between genes, genetic regulation, and genes in populations. The lab exposes students to various techniques used in genetic experiments. Three hours lecture, three hours laboratory weekly. Prerequisite: BIO 112.

BIO 300 Ecology (4 cr.)

Designed to present the basic principles of ecology, the fundamentals of conservation, and problems in the environment. Considerable attention is devoted to the impact these have on human populations. The three basic areas stressed are Environment, Resources, and Populations. Three hours lecture, three hours laboratory weekly.  Prerequisite:  BIO 112 or consent of instructor.

BIO 307 Invertebrate Zoology (4 cr.)

Provides instruction on classification, morphology, physiology, development, ecology, and the economic importance of the major groups of invertebrates. Three hours lecture, three hours laboratory weekly. Prerequisite:  BIO 112. Credit, four hours. Offered in alternate years.

BIO 308 Comparative Anatomy of Vertebrates (4 cr.)

Emphasizes the anatomy of various groups of vertebrates from the evolutionary viewpoint. The laboratory includes the dissection of various types of animals to study organs and systems. Three hours lecture, three hours laboratory weekly. Prerequisites:BIO 112 and 213.

BIO 315 Cell Biology (4 cr.)

A study of the molecular organization, function, and assembly of eukaryotic cell components, including membranes and membranous organelles. Includes discussion of cell surface phenomena, cell motility, energy production, and transport mechanisms. Three hours lecture, three hours laboratory weekly. Prerequisites: BIO 112 and 213 and CHE 102.

BIO 321 Histology (4 cr.)

Presents in simple and systematic form the most important morphological characteristics of the tissues and organs of mammals. It attempts to make clear what features are to be seen in ordinary preparations, what points require special techniques demonstration, and what is to be expected as a result of investigation outside the scope of this course. Three hours lecture, three hours laboratory weekly. Prerequisite: BIO 308. Offered in alternate years.

BIO 324 Principles of Physiology (4 cr.)

The function of animals as a whole as indicated by the physiology and interrelationship of different organs and organ systems with emphasis on humans. Molecular mechanisms of neurophysiology and muscular contraction are considered. Homeostatic mechanisms of circulation, respiration, metabolism, ionic regulation,and excretion in mammals are compared with those in other animals. Three hours lecture, three hours laboratory weekly. Prerequisite: BIO 308.

BIO 350 Seminar in Biology (1 cr.)

Students may present oral and automated presentations on a topic approved by the instructor. Meets one hour weekly. No prerequisite. Offered fall and spring.

BIO 399 Biology Comprehensive

This is a comprehensive examination given at the end of the junior year. This examination will be based on the core biology requirements. It is designed to assess the general knowledge of information in biology. A minimum of 70% is needed to pass.

BIO 401 General Parasitology (4 cr.)

Instruction provided on the general principles of parasitism and biological interrelationships as exhibited by protozoans, helminthes and arthropods. Emphasis is placed on epidemiology, life cycles, diagnosis, pathogenicity, prevention, control, and treatment of pathogenic organisms and diseases. Three hours lecture, three hours laboratory weekly. Prerequisites: BIO 308. Offered in alternate years.

BIO 406 Vertebrate Embryology (4 cr.)

Emphasizes the dynamic nature of embryonic events that transform an apparently structure-less egg into an individual having all the structures and functions characteristic of a vertebrate organism. This course focuses on the molecular, cellular and structural factors that contribute to the formation of an organism which are essential for creating health care strategies for better reproductive outcomes. Early development of amphioxus and amphibians and the study of the development of chick and mammalian embryos are discussed and studied. Three hours lecture, three hours laboratory weekly.  Prerequisite:  BIO 308 and BIO 324 or consent of the instructor.

BIO 411 Research Techniques in Biology (4 cr.)

Emphasizes general biochemical and biomedical research techniques. Instruction provided on the use of selected instruments in professional laboratories. Six hours lecture and laboratory weekly. Prerequisite: CHE 211 or consent of the instructor.

BIO 412 Research in Biology (4 cr.)

Requires the completion of a research project that has been approved by the professor. The project must be written and/or presented orally. Six hours of lecture and laboratory weekly. Prerequisite: Biology 411 or consent of the instructor.

BIO 490 Selected Topics (3 cr.)

An in-depth study of a topic of current interest in the natural sciences. Prerequisite: BIO 213 or permission of instructor.

BIO 499 Independent Study (2 - 4cr.)

Selected topics and in-depth study in a specific area of the natural sciences is carried out under the supervision of a faculty member. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor.


Chemistry

CHE 101 Introduction to Chemical Science (4 cr.)

A study of the important principles and methods of chemistry, with applications to the more common elements and their periodic properties. For non-science majors. Three hours of lecture, two hours of laboratory weekly. 

CHE 111 General Chemistry (4 cr.)

Provides instruction on chemical terminology, atomic and molecular theories, stoichiometry, and states of matter thermodynamics, solutions, colloids, chemical kinetics, and equilibrium. Prerequisite: MAT 115 or equivalent. Lecture three hours, laboratory two hours weekly.

CHE 112 General Chemistry and Qualitative Analysis (4 cr.)

A continuation of Chemistry 101, including introduction of organic chemistry, pH, solubility product, and laboratory devoted to anion and cation qualitative inorganic analysis using semi-micro techniques. Prerequisite: CHE 101. Three hours lecture, two hours laboratory weekly.

CHE 201 Quantitative Analysis (4 cr.)

Theories of titrimetric and gravimetric quantitative inorganic analysis with corresponding macro-scales methods for analysis for chlorides, sulfate, iron, etc. Prerequisites: CHE 102. Three hours lecture; three hours laboratory weekly.

CHE 210-211 Organic Chemistry (4 cr. each semester)

Study of the treatment of the structure, properties, nomenclature, and carbon compound, including stereochemistry, functional group transformation and reaction mechanisms of organic compounds. The laboratory emphasizes the practical synthesis of organic compound, including various methods of purification, identification and writing of scientific laboratory report. Prerequisite: CHE 102. Three hours lecture, three hours laboratory weekly.

CHE 300 Biochemistry (4 cr.)

A study and interpretation of the biochemical changes associated with self-controlled organisms and the chemicals (carbohydrates, lipids, protein, enzymes, etc.) that effect these changes. Prerequisites: CHE 211. Three hours laboratory weekly.

CHE 310-311 Physical Chemistry (4 cr. each semester)

The fundamental theories and principles of chemistry and their applications, with the understanding of the properties of matter and how these properties stem from the behavior of individual atoms. Emphasis on thermodynamics, molecular structure, chemical bonding, and kinetics. The laboratory is an introduction to the advanced techniques of physical measurements as they apply to chemistry. Prerequisites: CHE 211, MAT 216, and PHY 252. Three hours lecture, three hours laboratory weekly.

CHE 350 Environmental Chemistry (4 cr.)

Topics such as air, water, and thermal pollution, solid wastes, recycling and the effects of foreign substances on living systems are discussed. The properties of the atmosphere, naturally occurring waters, sources and effects of pollution, and ways in which pollution can be reduced, are examined by applying detailed chemical analysis of selected compounds. A problem-solving approach is emphasized. The chemical principles of environmental chemistry are explained through laboratory experiments. Prerequisite: CHE 102. Three hours lecture and three hours laboratory weekly.

CHE 380 Inorganic Chemistry (3 cr.)

A study of chemical reactions and properties of representative elements and their compounds, including coordination and organometallic chemistry. Attention is given to both theoretical and descriptive approaches. Prerequisites: CHE 201, 211. Three hours of lecture weekly.

CHE 399 Comprehensive Examination (0 cr.)

This is a comprehensive examination given at the end of the junior year. This examination will be based on the core chemistry requirements. It is designed to assess the general knowledge of information in chemistry. A minimum of 70% is needed to pass.

CHE 415 Advanced Organic Chemistry (3 cr.)

A treatment of special topics in Organic Chemistry with special consideration given to reaction mechanisms, stereochemistry, molecular structure, and selected methods of synthesis. Prerequisite: CHE 211. Three hours of lecture weekly.

CHE 420 Instrumental Analysis (4 cr.)

Fundamental principles of various instruments and methods as associated with them in analysis by colorimetry, coulometry, refractometer, spectros copy, chromatography, and magnetic resonance. Prerequisite:CHE 311. Three hours lecture, four hours laboratory weekly.

CHE 433 Qualitative Organic Analysis (4 cr.)

Designed to acquaint the student with various methods of identifying organic compounds through an extended treatment of class reactions, test for chemical properties, and the preparation of derivatives. Prerequisite:  CHE 211. Two hours lecture, four hours laboratory weekly.

CHE 450 Senior Research Seminar (4 cr.)

Requires a research project selected by the student and approved by the assigned research advisor. Students are familiarized with chemical literature and procedures. CHE 201, 211 and 311 or consent of advisor. Two hours lecture, four hours laboratory weekly.

CHE 499 Independent Study (2 – 4 cr.)

A laboratory and library investigation of chemical problems with a research project of interest. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor.


Physics

PHY 101 Introduction to Physical Science (4cr.)

A study of the concepts of mechanics, and heat and sound. Emphasis is placed on building concepts, grasping principles, and learning how concepts can be quantitatively measured and calculated. Three hours lectures, two hours laboratory weekly. Designed for non-science majors. Prerequisite MAT 111 or higher (may be taken concurrently).

PHY 221-222 College Physics (4 cr. each semester)

A non-calculus based course of General Physics for biology majors, covering mechanics, heat, sound, electricity and magnetism, and elements of atomic and nuclear physics. Three hours lecture and three hours laboratory weekly. Prerequisite: MAT 160.

PHY 251-252 University Physics (4 cr. each semester)

A calculus-based course of classical physics with elements of modern physics for mathematics and science majors. It covers mechanics, coustics, thermodynamics, kinetic theory of gases, electrodynamics, atomic and nuclear physics. Three 121 hours lecture and three hours laboratory weekly. Prerequisite: MAT 214 (may be taken concurrently).

PHY 305 Modern Physics (3 cr.)

Foundation of modern physics, including theory of relativity, quantization of matter and energy, introduction to quantum mechanics and its application to the explanation of properties of atoms, nuclei, and crystals. Three hours lecture. Prerequisites: PHY 222 or 252, MAT 216.

PHY 315 Mechanics (3 cr.)

Systematic presentation of elements of classical mechanics, including dynamics of particles and rigid bodies, introduction to moving coordinate systems and Lagrange’s and Hamilton ion method. Prerequisites: PHY 251, MAT 214. Three hours lecture weekly.

PHY 320 Electricity and Magnetism. (3 cr.)

A study of Maxwell’s equations and their application to topics in electrostatics and electrodynamics, including electromagnetic waves in vacuum and solid medium. Prerequisites: PHY 252 or 222, MAT 216. Three hours lecture weekly.

PHY 325 Electronics (3 cr.)

An introduction of basic electronics and instrumentation for Electrical Engineers and Physics majors. This lab/lecture course includes study of AC and DC circuits, diodes, rectifiers, transistors and operational amplifiers. Prerequisites: PHY 252 or 222. Two hours lecture and three hours laboratory weekly.

PHY 330 Thermodynamics (3 cr.) A study of the fundamental concepts of thermodynamics, including temperature, entropy, internal energy, thermodynamic potential, laws of thermodynamics and their consequences, and thermodynamics of irreversible process. Prerequisites: PHY 252, MAT 322. Three hours lecture weekly.

PHY 405 Quantum Mechanics (3 cr.) Introduction to quantum formalism, Schrodinger equation for a variety of potentials, simple harmonic oscillator, angular momentum, the hydrogen atom and application to nuclear physics. Prerequisites: PHY 305, MAT 322. Three hours lecture weekly.

PHY 411-412 Advanced Laboratory I and II (2 cr.)

A variety of experiments in diverse areas of Modern and classical physics, emphasizing independent work. These experiments develop the fundamental skill needed for a physicist and engineer. Prerequisites: PHY 222 or PHY 252. Four hours laboratory weekly.

PHY 481-482 Research in Physics (2 - 4 cr.)

Individual research and scholarly investigation under the supervision of a physics faculty. A written report and oral presentation are required after the completion of the course. Prerequisite: permission of the department. Four to eight hours weekly.

PHY 491-492 Physics and Engineering Seminar (1 cr.)

A required seminar course for junior and senior pre-engineering and physics majors. Each student presents an oral and written presentation on a topic in physics or engineering in his or her senior year.

PHY 491 Physics and Engineering Seminar (1 cr.)

A required seminar course for junior and senior pre-engineering and physics majors. Each student presents an oral and written presentation on a topic in physics or engineering in their senior year.


Natural Science

NSC 260 Introduction to Environmental Science (4)
NSC 290 African American Perspectives in Science (3)
NSC 300 Research Integrity (1)
NSC 301 MARC U*STAR Honors Seminar (0)
NSC 311 Introduction to Biomedical Research (3)
NSC 320 Biological Chemistry (4)
NSC 330 Molecular Biology (4)
NSC 412 Senior MARC U*STAR Honors Research and Thesis (4)